The Staffordshire Millennium Embroideries

Created by Sylvia M Everitt MBE
 
Eleventh Century Panel

Index
12th century
13th century
14th century
15th century
16th century
17th century
18th century
19th century
20th century
the map
the map key



The story behind the monastery at Lapley takes us back to pre-conquest days when the Earls of Mercia were such a strong and influential family. In 1061, Burchard, the brother of Edwin and Morcar who were mentioned earlier, became gravely ill while travelling through France. He was cared for by the monks at the Abbey of St Regimus and Rheims. After his death, Birchard's father gave them land at Lapley in memory of tthe attention they had given to his dying son. Later in the century these foreign monks established a cell on their righteously acquired Lapely soil. Now read on.........

The above extract is from the book written by Dianne Mannering about the history of Staffordshire woven into Sylvia Everitt's embroideries. Click here to find out more about the book or to buy a signed copy

 

From Sylvia's library

Sylvia's review:

The Year 1000 - What Life was like at the turn of the First Millennium. By Robert Lacy and Danny Danziger
For anyone curious to know what was happening in England before the usual cut-off date of 1066 - this book is for you.
Based on the Julius Work Calendar which was written by a monk of Canterbury around 1020, it list the high days and holy days of the Roman Church. Each chapter is headed with a charming little vignette of the agricultural task to be done in that month. Drawn in the typically naive medieval style each time I look at them I feel inspired to translate them into embroidery.
The world of 1000AD is less complicated with religion and women had more equality with men than post-Norman conquest. It presents the Anglo-Saxons as down-to earth, pragmatic and hard-working, although, some of the old English law codes of "Enga-lond" would appear strange to modern eyes, for example, "if a man fondle the breasts of a free woman uninvited, he shall be fined five shillings". The rape of a free woman incurred the penalty of sixty shillings, payable direct to the victim. This was the time of "Wer-geld" when everything and everyone had their price!
And this book is priceless for giving an in depth insight into the world of our highly skilled but often under-rated and ignored Anglo-Saxon forebears.
   

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